Dead Sea Magnesium [Giveaway]

October 27, 2017 at 10:50 am

If you’ve been reading my blog for long, you’re well aware of my magnesium obsession. No shortage of posts about its many uses and virtues around here:

OurSource4

The Dead Sea contains vastly more magnesium chloride than any other body of water on our planet

Magnesium for Healthier Moms and Babies

February 28, 2014 at 11:00 pm

My brother and his wife came into town and visited us on Monday. My brother mentioned that he was having horrible neck pain. “Magnesium!!” I yelled at him as I slathered his neck and shoulder with magnesium oil cream and spray.

823103185872116_a-faf76df4_0bOiUQ_pm

It’s been several years since I read The Magnesium Miracle by Carolyn Dean, M.D., N.D. But I was skimming through it the other day and came upon the chapter about magnesium’s impact on pregnancy-related issues and early infancy. I shared some of this info in my 2010 blogpost “Magnesium for Pregnancy and Beyond,” but I felt impressed to share a bit more today. I’ve got a lot to do today, so I’m going to be lazy and just quote Dr. Carolyn Dean.

Soothe Your Life with Magnesium

February 24, 2014 at 9:04 pm

I’ve been in love with magnesium for years. Several months ago I stumbled on a website where a lady mentioned a brand of magnesium oil I’d never heard of… Magnesoothe [now called Mg12], sourced from the Dead Sea. She said it was the most effective magnesium oil she had ever used, and she 10386777_946446232048628_8039968799941556132_nhad used several of the other brands available. That totally caught my interest. And I thought it couldn’t hurt to contact the company and see if they ever send samples for bloggers to review. It was perfect timing ’cause they had just discussed doing that very thing in a recent company meeting. A few days later I received my samples in the mail.

Before I get to my review of these products, I want to touch briefly on some of the benefits of using magnesium topically.

Healing your home

May 14, 2011 at 10:54 pm

So… air pollution. We hear so much about the global warming debate, but we rarely hear about how toxins in our air may be impacting human health and happiness. This subject has been on my mind a lot over the past week, and I felt impressed to do some digging about it. How are those toxins impacting pregnant women and their babies?  And how can we protect ourselves?

What I found was that prenatal and early exposure to air pollutants has been linked to a growing number of health and behavioral issues. Here are a few:

Preterm birth

“For the first trimester, the odds of preterm birth consistently increased with increasing carbon monoxide exposures and also at high levels of exposure to particulate matter . . . . Women exposed to carbon monoxide above 0.91 ppm during the last 6 weeks of pregnancy experienced increased odds of preterm birth” (Source).

Reduced fetal growth

“Over the past decade there has been mounting evidence that ambient air pollution during pregnancy influences fetal growth. . . . We found strong effects of ambient air pollution on ultrasound measures” (Source).

Growing, Glowing, and Going: Slacker

November 1, 2010 at 11:03 pm

So I was going to write a series of posts sharing my adventures exercising through this pregnancy.  Ha.  Oops. My only excuse is that I got too busy researching and posting about other topics like preventing postpartum hemorrhage, the perils of cervical scar tissue, the bed rest myth, and preventing preterm labor. So I’m not a total slacker-blogger, right? ;-)

The latest on my pregnant runner exploits is… well… I’m a slacker. I did really well going running 2-3 times a week (and listening to LOTS of podcasts) up until the last few weeks. I started noticing some discomfort in my lower abdomen and found myself walking a lot more than running on those last several runs. So I decided it was time to transition into the walking stage of my prenatal exercise regimen. We have taken several walks since then, but not nearly as many as I should be taking. And I’m feeling more and more of the effects of my lack of exercise… more aches and pains, general lack of energy, etc.

The Bed Rest Myth

September 28, 2010 at 10:53 pm

“Bed rest does not appear to improve the rate of preterm birth and should not be routinely recommended.” -American College of Obstetricians and Gynecologists

“The majority of women who are on bed rest don’t need to be, and many experience physical, emotional, and financial complications that are completely unnecessary.” -Mark Taslimi, M.D., professor of maternal-fetal medicine at Stanford University

“Just because something is widely believed doesn’t make it true. Scientifically, bed rest is simply not a valid treatment.” -John Thorp, M.D., a maternal-fetal specialist at the University of North Carolina School of Medicine in Chapel Hill

Disclaimer: Nothing contained in this post should be considered medical advice. If you have concerns or questions, please consult with your healthcare provider.

Several weeks ago, someone I care about was put on bed rest (at seven months pregnant) for some worrisome cramping she had been and continues to be experiencing.  Her situation catapulted preterm labor and bed rest onto my radar screen with big flashing red lights.  I had never really given preterm labor or bed rest much thought because I had never experienced them nor had anyone close to me.  As I started digging into the scientific literature on these subjects, I was totally blown away by what I discovered.  I’ve been researching pregnancy and childbirth topics for over seven years, but, yet again, I’m asking myself, “How did I not know this before?”

Before I dive into those stunning facts, let me first set the scene with the not-so-pretty reality of the bed rest experience.

Bed Rest Challenges

“Rest cure” has been recommended to women as a means of treating a wide variety of physical and emotional ailments since the 1800’s.   Almost a million American women are prescribed bed rest during their pregnancies every year for all types of pregnancy complications. 

Preventing postpartum hemorrhage naturally

August 25, 2010 at 4:39 am

Childbirth involves blood loss. There’s no way around it. How much blood a woman loses is the potentially dangerous variable. Postpartum hemorrhage accounts for the majority of maternal deaths worldwide. Fortunately, in the United States where maternity care is more readily accessible, most postpartum hemorrhages are not fatal. But they do happen, regardless of where you give birth.

So what do we know about postpartum hemorrhage?

Who is most at risk of experiencing a postpartum hemorrhage soon after giving birth?

  • Women with pregnancy induced hypertension
  • Women who experience a prolonged second stage of labor
  • Women who are induced or have their labors augmented with Pitocin
  • Women whose babies are delivered via vacuum extraction
  • Women with “large for gestational age” infants

(Source: Obstetric risk factors and outcome of pregnancies complicated with early postpartum hemorrhage: A population-based study)

Magnesium for pregnancy and beyond

July 20, 2010 at 6:54 pm

823103185872116_a-faf76df4_0bOiUQ_pm

Magnesium is incredibly important.  (Especially for pregnant women, but I’ll get to that later.) Magnesium is probably most well-known for its partnership with calcium in muscle function–calcium contracts muscles, magnesium relaxes them.  But magnesium is actually involved in far more than that.  From what I gather, every time a nerve cell fires, magnesium is required to control the entry of calcium into the body’s cells.

Visit Us On FacebookVisit Us On TwitterVisit Us On Pinterest